Agapanthus

Out for a walk this morning and I paused for a moment to admire a bank of blue and white agapanthus flowers. A bit guiltily, I might add, as we’re all supposed to be wary of agapanthus after Weedbusters and the Auckland Regional Council declared the southern Africa native a threat to our native bush, although it’s still to appear on the National Plant Pest Accord.

It escaped inclusion in the 2011/12 updated list but the trade off was a banning of sales in the Auckland region of agapanthus types that grow over 50cm tall.

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A bank of miniature agapanthus at Te Puna Quarry Park. Photo: Sandra Simpson

But agapanthus have plenty of fans too. Their fibrous root systems are great for holding banks together, the plants are drought tolerant and can be used to give a tropical look to a garden, they have reliable, showy flowers over a long period and will grow in full sun or heavy shade, and are a sure bet for coastal gardens … but they can quickly grow into large, difficult-to-remove clumps (stock will eat the leaves down to the ground, but the tubers are likely poisonous) and should be dead-headed to prevent seeding.

So, a six and two-threes situation.

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Agapanthus Thunder Storm bred by Ian Duncalf. Photo: Courtesy Ian Duncalf

However, plant breeders are coming to the rescue with sterile and low-fertility forms. Renowned Australian plantsman Anthony Tesselaar waxes lyrical about his company’s Storm series of agapanthus, which includes the variegated – and sterile – Thunder Storm bred by Ian Duncalf of Te Puna, near Tauranga.

There has been some research done into sterile and low-fertility forms, including at Landcare Research (the information is undated on the link, but is from 2012) and at Auckland Regional Botanic Gardens (the trial to find “ecopanthus” continues there this summer), which is where Agapanthus Seafoam originated.

 

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Agapanthus Finn, a sterile dwarf agapanthus bred by Ian Duncalf and named after his youngest son. Photo: Sandra Simpson

Non-invasive agapanthus bred by Terry Hatch of Joy Plants in Auckland include Pavlova, Baby Pete and Sarah.

The Royal New Zealand Institute of Horticulture in 2012 published an illustrated article on agapanthus in this country (pdf).

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